GLEETV: We just tried to call a fan

GLEETV: We just tried to call a fan

My brother said something so beautiful to me over Christmas. He’s a musician too, and we grew up on the same music, and we love the same music. He looked me dead in the eye and said, ‘Just promise me your record won’t smell like compromise.’ And that hit me so hard. I was like, ‘Oh my god, I’ve been compromising everything!’ I would take a bullet for this man, so hearing that really got me into high gear. I have a real opportunity with this album: the goal for it is to make a statement.
Darren Criss [x] (via jenndesq)
randomactsofdouchebaggery:

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

As much as I tend to side-eye most writing advice, I pretty much ascribe my writing process to Steinbeck’s advice.

randomactsofdouchebaggery:

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

As much as I tend to side-eye most writing advice, I pretty much ascribe my writing process to Steinbeck’s advice.

girliesportsjunkie:

thisdoesnotsuck:

When Honey Maid made a commercial about what makes families, family, they received a lot of comments. This is what they did with them.

This is an absolutely beautiful response, and on a lot of levels: the aesthetics, without question. And in terms of message, brilliance. There’s a lot of talk I see on my dash about PR and its role in marketing of both products and personalities. Some of its is accurate. Some of it is misguided. Some of it is flat-out fiction. But if you want to see a truly outstanding representation of public relations, look no further than this clip.

Honey Maid stuck to its guns, told the haters to stick it, and did so wrapped in love. And in the process, reinforced a positive image of the brand.

I have a split personality I guess. My boyfriend likes to call me “Country heart, city mouth.” That kind of sums me up in a nutshell. I have a very dichotomous personality probably because I grew up half in Alabama and half in New York. Just be yourself, that’s the thing.

shevinefeels:

joyful-destynie:

webelieveyou:

No more excuses.

I will forever reblog this

It’s sort of horrifying that we all know what they’re talking about without them really saying it.. that it’s become that much of a norm in our society that we just know.

the-real-team-starkid:

leakycon:

We are so excited to announce that Team StarKid will perform a special one-time-only reading of “Starship: Requiem,” the romantic sci-fi comedy sequel to their 2011 space odyssey “Starship.” The story follows the adventures of Mega-Girl the robot and her half-witted Starship Ranger husband.
The newlyweds are sucked into a black hole of trouble when they go to visit Mega-Girl’s human-hating family, including her overbearing mother-unit, her jealous sister-unit and the return of her hunky ex-boyfriend-unit.
As an added bonus for LeakyCon attendees, Team StarKid will celebrate their five-year anniversary at a retrospective panel where they will answer questions, share stories and read some of the deleted scenes from their “Very Potter Musical” series. Read more…

We’re going to LeakyCon again this year! A reading of Starship: Requiem as well as some deleted bits from the AVPM series!

the-real-team-starkid:

leakycon:

We are so excited to announce that Team StarKid will perform a special one-time-only reading of “Starship: Requiem,” the romantic sci-fi comedy sequel to their 2011 space odyssey “Starship.” The story follows the adventures of Mega-Girl the robot and her half-witted Starship Ranger husband.

The newlyweds are sucked into a black hole of trouble when they go to visit Mega-Girl’s human-hating family, including her overbearing mother-unit, her jealous sister-unit and the return of her hunky ex-boyfriend-unit.

As an added bonus for LeakyCon attendees, Team StarKid will celebrate their five-year anniversary at a retrospective panel where they will answer questions, share stories and read some of the deleted scenes from their “Very Potter Musical” series. Read more…

We’re going to LeakyCon again this year! A reading of Starship: Requiem as well as some deleted bits from the AVPM series!

Imagine this:
Instead of waiting in her tower, Rapunzel slices off her long, golden hair with a carving knife, and then uses it to climb down to freedom.
Just as she’s about to take the poison apple, Snow White sees the familiar wicked glow in the old lady’s eyes, and slashes the evil queen’s throat with a pair of sewing scissors.
Cinderella refuses everything but the glass slippers from her fairy godmother, crushes her stepmother’s windpipe under her heel, and the Prince falls madly in love with the mysterious girl who dons rags and blood-stained slippers.

Imagine this:
Persephone goes adventuring with weapons hidden under her dress.
Persephone climbs into the gaping chasm.
Or, Persephone uses her hands to carve a hole down to hell.
In none of these versions is Persephone’s body violated unless she asks Hades to hold her down with his horse-whips.
Not once does she hold out on eating the pomegranate, instead biting into it eagerly and relishing the juice running down her chin, staining it red.
In some of the stories, Hades never appears and Persephone rules the underworld with a crown of her own making.
In all of them, it is widely known that the name Persephone means Bringer of Destruction.

Imagine this:
Red Riding Hood marches from her grandmother’s house with a bloody wolf pelt.
Medusa rights the wrongs that have been done to her.
Eurydice breaks every muscle in her arms climbing out of the land of the dead.

Imagine this:
Girls are allowed to think dark thoughts, and be dark things.

Imagine this:
Instead of the dragon, it’s the princess with claws and fiery breath
who smashes her way from the confines of her castle
and swallows men whole.

'Reinventing Rescuing,' theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)

knittywriter:

gleekto:

Even their annoyance had intimacy. Also comedy.

seriously. This is real life, living with the person you love more than anything but also actually picturing how it will feel to hold the cast-iron frying pan in your hands before you thwack them across the back of the head with it.

For ^that^ comment, because that is exactly my experience of living with my partner!